Matylda Tyler

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Oct 1
magnusrayne:


The Mortal Instruments: a summary

magnusrayne:

The Mortal Instruments: a summary

Oct 1

shadesofamethyst:

I love journals

(Source: fannybnn)

Oct 1
Oct 1

review of “animal farm”

transhumanisticpanspermia:

rabioheab:

not a very good instructional guide on farming. would NOT recommend to first time farmers

instructions weren’t clear enough, accidentally turned farm into maoist rather than stalinist allegory

dougrausch:

matyldatyler:

My family thinks I’m crazy. They might be right.

literally, me.

Book-crazy people, unite.

dougrausch:

matyldatyler:

My family thinks I’m crazy. They might be right.

literally, me.

Book-crazy people, unite.

mkgaud:

Always Kiss Me Goodnight

mkgaud:

Always Kiss Me Goodnight

Rant. 
Notice the similarities. The title beginning with “City of”, the use of a city landscape on the bottom of the cover, heck, even the author’s pseudonym is Magnus. The main difference? The book on the left was one of the worst works of fiction I’ve ever read, or attempted to read, as I still have 150 pages to go. I’m going to leave out plot problems, unnecessary characters, inexplicable actions of other characters, or the completely unnecessary smut going on in public places. Those are, sadly, the faults of many books in existence. The main problem with this particular novel is that it’s offensive to us, those who were born and raised in Prague, a place which “Magnus” deemed as the most suitable for the setting of this book. Prague is beautiful, and I understand why foreigners would find its mysteries and history so appealing, see it as an intriguing, faraway, almost magical place where anything could happen, a new setting to which they can be fictionally transported, a city worthy of fantasy setting, yet actually in existence. I understand that. And I would support “Magnus’s” endeavor, if only Prague and Czechs weren’t depicted in a manner we find insulting. Maybe it’s just me. Maybe readers not of Czech descent would enjoy this novel immensely. I admit I picked it up at a local bookstore out of curiosity, as I’ve never read anything set in Prague written by a foreign author. The disappointment I feel goes way beyond my wasted money. Sad as it may be, the English language sections at our bookstores are still primarily aimed at foreigners, tourists, visiting Prague. Should this be the souvenir they take back home with them to remember us by? Or was this book rather designed for our own enjoyment? It has to be one or the other, even if the book fails at both. Because if I’m wrong and neither of these options was the book’s intent, then I fail to see why it’s being sold and advertised here in Prague.
I’m not sure what could change my opinion in the remaining 150 pages, as the damage has already been done by chapter 6. No visual similarities to one of my favourite series could redeem it. Do not get me wrong, it is perfectly fine if an author wants to set his or her novel in a different country than his own. However, it should always be done in a respectful manner. As for now, I can only say that I will never recommend it to anyone, Czech or not. It does not paint an acceptable picture of the place I call home. If you’re thinking about reading City of Dark Magic, or perhaps you already have, please, do not associate “Magnus’s” version of Prague with the one I know and experience every day. The real one is so much more magical.

Rant. 

Notice the similarities. The title beginning with “City of”, the use of a city landscape on the bottom of the cover, heck, even the author’s pseudonym is Magnus. The main difference? The book on the left was one of the worst works of fiction I’ve ever read, or attempted to read, as I still have 150 pages to go. I’m going to leave out plot problems, unnecessary characters, inexplicable actions of other characters, or the completely unnecessary smut going on in public places. Those are, sadly, the faults of many books in existence. The main problem with this particular novel is that it’s offensive to us, those who were born and raised in Prague, a place which “Magnus” deemed as the most suitable for the setting of this book. Prague is beautiful, and I understand why foreigners would find its mysteries and history so appealing, see it as an intriguing, faraway, almost magical place where anything could happen, a new setting to which they can be fictionally transported, a city worthy of fantasy setting, yet actually in existence. I understand that. And I would support “Magnus’s” endeavor, if only Prague and Czechs weren’t depicted in a manner we find insulting. Maybe it’s just me. Maybe readers not of Czech descent would enjoy this novel immensely. I admit I picked it up at a local bookstore out of curiosity, as I’ve never read anything set in Prague written by a foreign author. The disappointment I feel goes way beyond my wasted money. Sad as it may be, the English language sections at our bookstores are still primarily aimed at foreigners, tourists, visiting Prague. Should this be the souvenir they take back home with them to remember us by? Or was this book rather designed for our own enjoyment? It has to be one or the other, even if the book fails at both. Because if I’m wrong and neither of these options was the book’s intent, then I fail to see why it’s being sold and advertised here in Prague.
I’m not sure what could change my opinion in the remaining 150 pages, as the damage has already been done by chapter 6. No visual similarities to one of my favourite series could redeem it. Do not get me wrong, it is perfectly fine if an author wants to set his or her novel in a different country than his own. However, it should always be done in a respectful manner. As for now, I can only say that I will never recommend it to anyone, Czech or not. It does not paint an acceptable picture of the place I call home. If you’re thinking about reading City of Dark Magic, or perhaps you already have, please, do not associate “Magnus’s” version of Prague with the one I know and experience every day. The real one is so much more magical.
Books read in September. Still baffled.

Books read in September. Still baffled.

abandonedmarionette:

A Series of Adorable Vocabulary Lessons by Lemony Snicket

The Bad Beginning